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Subject:to be proud
Time:03:36 pm
Current Mood:curiouscurious
I was thinking today that I wanted to say in Latin "I'm proud of you" but the only words I could think of or find in the dictionary were forms of superbus, which means more like proud as in haughty. There was a note that it was poetic and/or post-Augustan usage to use superbus to mean having pride in some accomplishment.

Is this just not a concept the Romans wrote about--to be proud of someone for their accomplishments--or am I missing something?

Multas gratias!
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tee_sama
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Time:2011-05-11 07:54 pm (UTC)
In my dictionary I found a phrase to be proud of something/someone - [something/someone] superbum esse./superbire (alqa re)

I don't think that superbus has negative connotation, at least not in the way I saw it used so far.
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tee_sama
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Time:2011-05-11 07:56 pm (UTC)
My language has pretty big distinction between what's "proud" with all the good implications and what's "haughty". Superbus is under the good proud.

I might have to check in better dictionary than the one I have at disposal, but I won't be able to get to my university's library until next week.
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thaichicken
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Time:2011-05-11 07:59 pm (UTC)
What language is that, may I ask? But that's good to know. Maybe I just need to find a better dictionary...
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tikiumbrella
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Time:2011-05-11 08:05 pm (UTC)
Superbus often has a negative connotation - it is often used in conjunction with rex or associated with the Tarquins. In Vergil (at least in the Aeneid) it never is completely divorced from its pejorative sense.
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tee_sama
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Time:2011-05-11 08:15 pm (UTC)
Thank you. :)

I need to read more!
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cnoocy
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Time:2011-05-12 03:36 am (UTC)
One of my dictionaries has "decus" as "source of pride" so "decus es mihi", perhaps?
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ioanna_ioannina
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Time:2011-05-12 08:42 am (UTC)
"Is this just not a concept the Romans wrote about..."

Yes, I think so. At least I haven´t encounter any phrase like "I´m proud of you" in the texts yet.
I think you will have to say it in completely another way. Like:

Hoc vere optime factum est et mihi maxime placet, o quantum gaudeo, quod tibimet ipsi, filio meo, tam bene contigit.

(Bene tibi contigit = well done; it is the nearest I can think of. You can find another ways if you like.)
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sollersuk
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Time:2011-05-12 09:20 am (UTC)
I think you're right about the concept - it doesn't really fit in with Roman culture. A father might be proud of his son, or a son proud of his father, but that was basically seen as right, proper and "pius". I can't really think of any other context.

You would not in any case want an adjective but a verb meaning the whole phrase of "to be proud of", or "to have pride in", but you would probably have to think about the deeper meaning of the expression. If it is that A feels pride as a result of B's actions or behaviour because A has had some input into it, that might be doable; for example, if A is B's father he might indeed say to him "You are very pius".
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