You are viewing latin

[icon] The latin community - ablative of association
View:Recent Entries.
View:Archive.
View:Friends.
View:Profile.
View:Website (The Perseus Project).

Security:
Subject:ablative of association
Time:04:49 am
I'm trying to compile a fairly comprehensive list of the uses of the ablative, because I like lists and I like learning from lists, and I ran into this thing--the ablative of association. Thing is, it's not in Wheelock's, nor in the other textbook that I'm referring to (D'Ooge); it only shows up, as far as I can Google, in Bennett's New Latin Grammar (which is not exactly new any more). Which piqued my curiosity: is this just a peculiarity of Bennett? Has this use of the ablative been subsumed in later classifications of the uses? Or is he being ultra-thorough in his listing? Hard to imagine Wheelock's missing much, though.

For reference, this is the NLG's explanation:

"The Ablative is often used with verbs of joining, mixing, clinging, exchanging; also with assuēscō, cōnsuēscō, assuēfaciō, and some others to denote association; as,—

improbitās scelere jūncta, badness joined with crime;
āēr calōre admixtus, air mixed with heat;
assuētus labōre, accustomed to (lit. familiarized with) toil;
pācem bellō permūtant, they change peace for (lit. with) war."

Thanks in advance!
comments: Leave a comment Previous Entry Add to Memories Share Next Entry


eilidhsd
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-06-20 09:37 am (UTC)
Kennedy has a section on it: he says the Ablative of Association is used with verbs and adjectives denoting plenty, fulness, possession of
one of his examples: Villa abundat gallina, lacte, caseo, melle (Cicero) - the farm abounds in (with) poultry, milk, cheese, honey.
Another was from Virgil, someone presenting a youth with a noble gift.
I would have thought that would be an ablative anyway, without needing to call it the Ablative of Association.

Jones and Sidwell don't mention it; Kennedy is much older - bit of a running gag at times here. Everyone has a copy of his Revised Latin Primer, but no-one has ever seen the original!



Edited at 2012-06-20 09:38 am (UTC)
(Reply) (Thread)


evilstorm
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-06-20 11:11 am (UTC)
Interesting! Bennett has that use under ablative of means. I suppose they did just make up these categories as they went along. Thank you for the list, it helps a lot.
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)


eilidhsd
Link:(Link)
Time:2012-06-20 09:49 am (UTC)
Actually, if you are collecting lists, here's what Kennedy has for ablatives:
Ablative of Separation
Ablative of Origin
Ablative of Comparison

And then he has a separate section for Ablatives (plural) of Association which include the one I mentioned above but also seems to cover the rest of this list.
Ablative of Association - plenty etc
Ablative of Quality
Ablative of Respect or Specification
Ablative of the Manner in which something happens or is done

before he goes on to ablative absolutes and instrumental ablatives.
I don't know that sticking capital letters on something makes it something special, but there you go. My copy is 1955.
(Reply) (Thread)

[icon] The latin community - ablative of association
View:Recent Entries.
View:Archive.
View:Friends.
View:Profile.
View:Website (The Perseus Project).