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Subject:Translation help
Time:01:35 pm
I asked an acquaintance for helping translating the phrase "Let me see if my pattern will fit you." The sentence is spoken by a seamstress, so in this case "pattern" is referring to a pattern for making clothes. He suggested the following:

  permitte mihi videre si exemplar mea erit apta tibi.

He also suggested I check here for a second opinion.

Any feedback you can provide is much appreciated.

Thanks!
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svetlanacat4
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Time:2012-03-17 07:34 pm (UTC)
Let me see in English is like "voyons..." in French. Usually, "voyons..." is let's try. I'd choose experior, in the subjunctive, Experiamur...
In the indirect speech, I'd use "num" instead of "si"
Experiamur num exemplar meum tibi conveniat.

This link might help you: http://www.latin-dictionary.net/q/english/fit.html
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sollersuk
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Time:2012-03-17 07:57 pm (UTC)
"num" is a bit unkind since it expects the answer "no"!
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svetlanacat4
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Time:2012-03-17 08:08 pm (UTC)
Not in indirect speech.
It's possible to use "utrum" instead of num. You can find both in Cicero's , Num more frequently than utrum, though.
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diaphanus
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Time:2012-06-04 07:32 am (UTC)
Yes, num does not expect the answer "no" in alternative indirect questions. ;)

I approve of the suggested Experiamur num exemplar meum tibi conveniat.
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