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Subject:E tenebrae lux. E lux tenebrae.
Time:06:57 pm
I'm pretty sure "E tenebrae lux" means what I want it to, namely "From darkness, light." (As sure as I can be without actually knowing the language, and while using multiple online sources.) But I'm not entirely sure, would "E lux tenebrae" mean "From light, darkness"? Does a comma after lux change the meaning significantly? ("E lux tenebrae" versus "E lux, tenebrae") If so, does "E tenebrae lux" also need a comma? Also, if I'm making any other glaring errors, I would like to know. Thanks in advance!

Edit: it now occurs to me I may be using the wrong form of tenebrae. I know very little about Latin construction, I'm afraid.
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catsidhe
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Time:2012-02-01 03:12 am (UTC)
ex takes the ablative: ex tenebris lux, and ex luce tenebrae.
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fayanora
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Time:2012-02-01 03:22 am (UTC)
Thanks!
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jojomojo
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Time:2012-02-01 03:24 am (UTC)
Also there was no such thing as comma in classical Latin. I don't think changing the word order would change the meaning.
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fayanora
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Time:2012-02-01 03:26 am (UTC)
Ah, that explains the weirdness on Google Translate when I added a comma. Thanks!
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fregimus
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Time:2012-02-01 08:19 am (UTC)
e lux tenebrae is probably ungrammatical. Tmesis occurs in poetry, but this example does not seem acceptable to me.

ex luce tenebra would mean from light, darkness.

catsidhe has tenebrae/ex tenebris in plural, while the source has a singular e tenebrae.

Do not trust Google Translate from/to Latin, especially so if you do not know the language (and use it for a good laugh if you do).
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catsidhe
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Time:2012-02-01 10:06 am (UTC)
You are correct that tenebrae/-is is plural. That is the form in which tenebrae is usually used, and is, in fact, the header form in Lewis & Short.
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ioanna_ioannina
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Time:2012-02-01 10:26 am (UTC)
Yes, it is plurale tantum. Tenebrae, - arum, f. It has a plural form and a singular meaning.
Otherwise, yes for the first comment about e, ex and ablative.
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fayanora
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Time:2012-02-02 04:07 am (UTC)
So "Ex luce tenebra" would be more correct than "Ex luce tenebrae"?
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fregimus
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Time:2012-02-02 07:38 am (UTC)
Not necessarily; rather the opposite. It will be as correct (or maybe as incorrect) as is your original "e tenebrae lux". Singular tenebrae would be certainly incorrect in Classical Latin, as catsidhe thoughtfully noted. But the language changed considerably with the 20 centuries of use, misuse and abuse, so correctness would rather depend on the period.

Plural form (see catsidhe's answer) would be correct for the language of any period, so you might prefer it, as long as you can change the original form, that this one is intended to be contrasting with, into the plural as well.
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