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Subject:help with homework
Time:04:38 pm

How are my translations?

Page 7

 

 

What does he see?

Quid videt?

 

They are giving nothing.

Nihil darent

 

You ought not to praise me

Non debet lauda me

 

If I err, he often warns me

Si erro, saepe monet me

 

If you love me, save me, please!

Si amare me, serva me, amabo te

 

Page 15

 

The girls save the poet’s life

Puellae vitae poetae servant

 

Without philosophy we often go astray and pay the penalty

sine philosophia saepe erraviamus et poenam dare

 

If your land is strong, nothing terrifies the sailors and you ought to praise your great fortune

Si tua terra est valet, nihil terreo nautae et tua debere laudare tua fortuna magna

 

We often see the penalty of anger

videamus saepe poena irae

 

The ancient gate is large

Porta antiqua est magna

 

 

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ukelele
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-08-26 09:24 pm (UTC)
"Nihil darent" -- think about the steps in forming a verb again (hint: the stem of "dare" is shorter than people tend to think).

"Non debet lauda me" -- which form of a verb is used for "*to* verb"?


"Si amare me..." -- who's the subject of "amare"? What does this suggest about its ending?

"Puellae vitae poetae servant" -- what function is "life" playing in this sentence? What does that imply about its case?

"Sine philosophia..." -- which principal part should you be starting with for erro? Also, remember that "we" go astray, but "we" also pay the price, so you need to conjugate that verb too.

"Si tua terra est valet, nihil terreo nautae et tua debere laudare tua fortuna magna"

Wow, first off, you should hurt the person who gave you this to translate, because it doesn't make any sense in English :P. That said.

"est valet" -- You can use a single verb (a form of "to be strong"), or you can use a verb "is" and an adjective "strong". But "est valet" literally means "it is it is strong". There's only one verb in English, so there should only be one in Latin. (This gets my students all the time because they typically want to translate *every* word, so they see "is" and translate it, and then they see "strong" and translate that. But remember "is strong" is one unit of meaning even though it's two words (in English). When you're doing English-->Latin translations, always be looking for the *units of meaning*, not the individual words.)

"terreo" -- who/what's the subject?

"nautae" -- what's their function in the sentence, and what does this imply about the case? (Hint: same as with "vitae" above.)

"debere" -- who's the subject?

laudare is right this time :).

"tua fortuna magna" -- hint: same deal as with vitae and nautae.

"videamus saepe poena irae" -- almost, but what's your vowel on videamus, and what case is poena (hint: same as vitae, nautae, and fortuna...when you figure out this case, learn it, love it :)

OK, you may be feeling very disheartened now, in which case I apologize, but you shouldn't. Firstly, Latin comp is *very hard* (but you will be a total Latin ninja once you master it!). Second, most of what you've done is actually right -- there are a lot of minor mistakes here and there, but the overall work is pretty credible, and I think you're well on your way in the right direction. Third, your errors aren't random but mostly fall in a few categories -- the case of vitae etc. and remembering to fit your verb endings to their subjects (or if they're infinitives). If you can master these things and learn to proofread for them, you'll have fixed the vast majority of errors on your own. now, happy revising! :)
(Reply) (Thread)

fenoxielo524
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-08-26 09:28 pm (UTC)
Page 7


What does he see?
Quid videt?
Looks good.


They are giving nothing.
Nihil darent
Check your conjugation of dō, dāre


You ought not to praise me
Non debet lauda me
"To praise" is what form of the verb in English?


If I err, he often warns me
Si erro, saepe monet me
Typically, the object comes before the verb, but this is still correct


If you love me, save me, please!
Si amare me, serva me, amabo te
If who loves you?


Page 15


The girls save the poet’s life
Puellae vitae poetae servant
Check case on vita. What case governs direct objects?


Without philosophy we often go astray and pay the penalty
sine philosophia saepe erraviamus et poenam dare
Wrong verb for "go astray." And as always, all verbs must be conjugated to agree with the subject. Who pays the penalty?


If your land is strong, nothing terrifies the sailors and you ought to praise your great fortune
Si tua terra est valet, nihil terreo nautae et tua debere laudare tua fortuna magna
Okay... valeō means "to be strong" so you don't need est... "nihil terreo?" Subject-verb agreement!... Remember that accusative governs direct objects... is the second person singular nominative, not tua, and your verb (debere) needs to agree with that... and again, the accusative is for direct objects.


We often see the penalty of anger
videamus saepe poena irae
Check your conjugation of videō and the case of poena.


The ancient gate is large
Porta antiqua est magna
Looks good.
(Reply) (Thread)

sivalesvaleo
Subject:Thanks and revisions
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-08-27 12:00 am (UTC)
Thanks very much for the help. Don’t worry, I have thick skin. I am working from Wheelock’s 6th Ed, Revised. I’ve posted my corrections. I probably still have mistakes with tu, tua. Our class will probably get to there in a couple weeks. For clarity, I have copied my revisions below the comments of the second post, fenoxielo524, though I thoroughly read and appreciate both sets of comments.

What does he see?
Quid videt?
Looks good.


They are giving nothing.
Nihil darent
Check your conjugation of dō, dāre
correction: nihil dant

You ought not to praise me
Non debet lauda me
"To praise" is what form of the verb in English?
correction: non debet me laudare

If I err, he often warns me
Si erro, saepe monet me
Typically, the object comes before the verb, but this is still correct
correction: si erro, saepe me monet

If you love me, save me, please!
Si amare me, serva me, amabo te
If who loves you?
correction: si me amas, serva me, amabo te

Page 15


The girls save the poet’s life
Puellae vitae poetae servant
Check case on vita. What case governs direct objects?
correction: Puellae vitam poetae servant


Without philosophy we often go astray and pay the penalty
sine philosophia saepe erraviamus et poenam dare
Wrong verb for "go astray." And as always, all verbs must be conjugated to agree with the subject. Who pays the penalty?
correction: sine philosophia saepe erramus poenam dant

If your land is strong, nothing terrifies the sailors and you ought to praise your great fortune
Si tua terra est valet, nihil terreo nautae et tua debere laudare tua fortuna magna
Okay... valeō means "to be strong" so you don't need est... "nihil terreo?" Subject-verb agreement!... Remember that accusative governs direct objects... tū is the second person singular nominative, not tua, and your verb (debere) needs to agree with that... and again, the accusative is for direct objects.
correction: si tua terra valet, nihil terres nautas et tu debes laudare tuam fortunam magnam


We often see the penalty of anger
videamus saepe poena irae
Check your conjugation of videō and the case of poena.
Correction: videmus saepe poenam irae


The ancient gate is large
Porta antiqua est magna
Looks good.
(Reply) (Thread)


lysimache
Subject:Re: Thanks and revisions
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-08-27 12:23 am (UTC)
correction: non debet me laudare

'laudare' is correct, good, but 'debet' is not -- 'debet' is 3rd person (s/he/it ought); you want the form for 'you ought'.

correction: sine philosophia saepe erramus poenam dant

Good, but look also at the second verb ('dant') -- it still needs to be in the "we" form. Also, 'et' needs to be put back in!

correction: si tua terra valet, nihil terres nautas et tu debes laudare tuam fortunam magnam

Almost there! Right now, you have "not at all do you terrify the sailors" -- fix the verb ending so that it is "nothing terrifies" (it-form, third person sing.).

Mostly, it seems like you're having some trouble remembering subject/verb agreement. You might want to have a look over the rules for that. But overall, pretty good with the corrections! :)

(Repost, now with correct html tags!)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)

sivalesvaleo
Subject:second revisions
Link:(Link)
Time:2007-08-28 12:01 am (UTC)
Thanks again, what a wonderful resource. I am posting a cumulative post of edits and comments.

What does he see?
Quid videt?
Looks good.


They are giving nothing.
Nihil darent
Check your conjugation of dō, dāre
correction: nihil dant

You ought not to praise me
Non debet lauda me
"To praise" is what form of the verb in English?
correction: non debet me laudare
'laudare' is correct, good, but 'debet' is not -- 'debet' is 3rd person (s/he/it ought); you want the form for 'you ought'.
2nd correction: non debes me laudare

If I err, he often warns me
Si erro, saepe monet me
Typically, the object comes before the verb, but this is still correct
correction: si erro, saepe me monet

If you love me, save me, please!
Si amare me, serva me, amabo te
If who loves you?
correction: si me amas, serva me, amabo te

Page 15


The girls save the poet’s life
Puellae vitae poetae servant
Check case on vita. What case governs direct objects?
correction: Puellae vitam poetae servant


Without philosophy we often go astray and pay the penalty
sine philosophia saepe erraviamus et poenam dare
Wrong verb for "go astray." And as always, all verbs must be conjugated to agree with the subject. Who pays the penalty?
correction: sine philosophia saepe erramus poenam dant
Good, but look also at the second verb ('dant') -- it still needs to be in the "we" form. Also, 'et' needs to be put back in!
second correction: sine philosophia saepe erramus et poenam damus

If your land is strong, nothing terrifies the sailors and you ought to praise your great fortune
Si tua terra est valet, nihil terreo nautae et tua debere laudare tua fortuna magna
Okay... valeō means "to be strong" so you don't need est... "nihil terreo?" Subject-verb agreement!... Remember that accusative governs direct objects... tū is the second person singular nominative, not tua, and your verb (debere) needs to agree with that... and again, the accusative is for direct objects.
correction: si tua terra valet, nihil terres nautas et tu debes laudare tuam fortunam magnam
Almost there! Right now, you have "not at all do you terrify the sailors" -- fix the verb ending so that it is "nothing terrifies" (it-form, third person sing.).
Second correction: si tua terra valet, nihil terret nautas et tu debes laudare tuam fortunam magnam

We often see the penalty of anger
videamus saepe poena irae
Check your conjugation of videō and the case of poena.
Correction: videmus saepe poenam irae

The ancient gate is large
Porta antiqua est magna
Looks good.
(Reply) (Thread)

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